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Warzone Streamers Are Allegedly Reverse Boosting to Ruin Tournaments

In order to get easier lobbies, Call of Duty: Warzone streamers are taking to reverse boosting their accounts.

Warzone is a game that can be a bit too challenging at times. Sometimes you're looking to just have a good time, not a hard one.

Warzone Plunder
(Source: Activision)

Some popular streamers probably feel the same way sometimes, and a process called reverse boosting will help them get what they need. As a plus, when they're next streaming to thousands of viewers, they'll have far easier lobbies to contend with.

Then they can simply drop in, destroy the competition, and rake in the donations.

What Is Reverse Boosting in Warzone?

Reverse boosting is the process of making your matches easier, by causing the game to believe you're worse than you actually are. In Warzone, the game's matchmaking system attempts to pair you with other players of your skill level.

Warzone shotgun
(Source: Activision)

Perform well, as many streamers are known to do, and you'll face off against better players. This skill-based matchmaking, or SBMM, has come under fire recently in the Call of Duty fan-base.

Hardcore players don't want to have to go up against others as good as them. The reason for this is that at a high-level, games quickly become dull.

If everyone is running top-tier loadouts and playing incredibly well, you need to do the same to compete. The game becomes stressful and it takes the fun out of it.

So you trick the system, with reverse boosting. You start missing your shots, letting others kill you.

And slowly, your kill/death ratio decreases, allowing you to play with others at your new level. Now your games are easier, and you're ready to slaughter the competition with your true skill.

Reverse Boosting to Ruin Warzone Tournaments

As for how reverse boosting is causing Warzone tournaments to be ruined, it's not so different an explanation. Take Vikkstar's Warzone Showdown as an example.

In the tournament rules, Vikkstar specifies that teams are limited to an 8.5 KD ratio cap. Therefore, if you outperform that ratio, say you get 9 kills for every death, you can't compete.

So in this case, a player that doesn't want to miss out on the tournament's $210,000 prize pool could reverse boost until they're allowed to enter. According to pro player Tommey, this is already happening.

warsz-tommey

In a series of deleted tweets, Tommey calls out fellow player WarsZ for reverse boosting. As evidence, he shares a screenshot of the user's recent history.

Tommey goes on to state that there's no rule in Vikkstar's tournament that specifically bans reverse boosting. Why the initial tweets have been deleted, we're not quite sure at present.

WarsZ responded to the accusations, stating that his poor performance was simply due to his "girl" playing on his account. The internet doesn't appear to be buying it, however.

This is all speculation for the most part, but Tommey does claim that many streamers are reverse boosting in Warzone. Not all of them are after tournament wins of course.

The fact of the matter is, reverse boosting leads to good content for many streamers. If you're ever watching a Warzone player that seems to be easily getting the best of the competition, it may be worth checking their CoD Tracker match history.

Reverse boosting isn't the only way to cheat the system in the popular battle royale title though. Lately, a new infinite Stim exploit has broken Warzone, allowing players to survive even in the gas.

Call of Duty is feeling increasingly exhausting as of late, especially now that Warzone bounties are crashing entire servers. Infinity Ward needs to make some changes to its game before the rest of the player base grows tired.

This news comes as the Black Ops Cold War Beta launches, with Treyarch making clear they'll be fighting against Reverse Boosting.